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Patience is a Virtue…But is it a Priority?

“Patience is a virtue” doesn’t mean what it used to. Technology pervades our lives so much that patience is virtually obsolete. When I was a kid, I watched The Jetsons thinking that future technology would save us so much time that we’d finish our work quickly, then be pampered by robots the rest of the day. Yet instead of freeing us from labor so we can play more, technology seems

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Pioneer Profiles: Isabella Bird

Isabella Bird had the pioneer spirit unlike any woman of her age. She was an avid horsewoman, photographer, writer, and naturalist. Born in 1831, as a child she was told she was sickly and that fresh air and travel were the cure. Taking her doctor’s advice to the extreme, she traveled all over the world during her lifetime. Trips to Korea, China, Japan, Western Europe, and the Middle and Far

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Shrine of the Sun

A common question I hear often from visitors to Colorado Springs is, “What is that little castle up on the mountain?” the Will Rogers Shrine of the Sun does look like a little castle since it is built in a Romanesque Revival style, so I can understand why people think it is one. I encourage tourists and natives alike to visit it, since it has an interesting history as well

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Confronting Chaos

May 28, 2001, my 35th birthday, started out like any other day. The sun was shining, the birds were chirping, and the only blot on the day was my attendance at a Celebration of Life service for my teaching mentor who had passed away due to brain cancer. But I figured that if the memorial was the only sad part of the day, so be it, because the rest of

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Going to the Mountains is Going Home

“Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out that going to the mountains is going home; that wildness is a necessity; and that mountain parks and reservations are useful not only as fountains of timber and irrigating rivers, but as fountains of life.” – John Muir, Our National Parks, 1901 It used to be that those who climbed Colorado fourteeners were often described as a “cult” of

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The Road No One Should Have Taken

The Hastings Cutoff is not a familiar landmark, and it is a road few had traveled by the summer of 1846. Looking at a modern picture of where the Cutoff diverges from the main California Trail makes me think about Robert Frost’s poem “The Road Not Taken,” which speaks of the author’s finding a fork in his path and wanting to see what both paths might lead to, but choosing

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