Posts by Kevin Arnold

Hey, Who’s That Guy with Judy Collins?

Yes, that’s me, as close to heaven as I’m likely to get here on Earth. I’ve been a Judy Collins fan for many years, but this last year she’s put me over the top with her new work with the songs of Stephen Sondheim. My sister hates Judy’s haircut, but, well, Judy Blue Eyes has entertained so many for so long that she should be able to wear her hair

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Kevin’s Much-Loved Poems: “The Weary Blues,” “The Blues Don’t Change,” and “Slow Drag Blues”

This continues the series of columns that highlights a much-loved poem and other poems that speak to, or resonate with, that poem. This week features “The Weary Blues,” crafted by Langston Hughes. The two related poems are “The Blues Don’t Change” by Al Young and “Slow Drag Blues” by Kevin Young. (While they share the same surname and were both Stegner Fellows, Al and Kevin are unrelated). The Poetry Foundation

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The Shandean Spirit Lives on—Man Martin’s The Lemon Jell-o Syndrome

Man Martin’s third novel will appear in May, 2017 from Unbridled Books. The book suggests a corollary  to James A. Michener’s quote, “If your book doesn’t keep you up nights when you are writing it, it won’t keep anyone up nights reading it.” The corollary is that if your book doesn’t keep you chuckling writing it, don’t expect people to laugh either. The good news is that this novel had to have

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“Nostalgia,” “To His Coy Mistress,” and “Invitation to the Opera.”

This is part of a series of columns that feature a most-loved poem. Each of these poems is coupled with and a poem or two that speak to, or resonate with, the first poem. This week’s poem is “Nostalgia” by Billy Collins, written in 1991. The two other poems are “To His Coy Mistress” by Andrew Marvell and my own “Invitation to the Opera.” Collins’ poem is my personal favorite. The complete Poetry Foundation

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Kevin’s Much-Loved Poems: “One Art,” “Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night,” and “Driven by Love”

This column’s primary poem is “One Art” by Elizabeth Bishop, written in 1975. Although the first line of this poem is “The art of losing isn’t hard to master;” the same way Steven Sondheim’s “Send in the Clowns” isn’t about clowns, this isn’t about losing things, certainly not keys. Both follow Emily Dickinson’s edict: “Tell the truth, but tell it slant.” Included are a couple of other poems that speak to, or resonate

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Kevin’s Much-Loved Poems: “Lament,” “Holy Sonnet 10,” and “The Sick Rose.”

This continues the series of columns that highlight a much-loved poem and presents other poems that speak to, or resonate with, that poem. In this column I’m reacting to a nearby tragedy. A poet friend of mine has lost her husband in a bicycling accident, leaving her to finish raising two girls on her own. Because one poem confronts the absence of a spouse head-on, it quickly came to mind: “Lament”

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