Tag On Writing

Writing for the Universe

I hate writing for the universe. It’s like dancing in front of a jeering crowd, painfully aware of yourself. You feel caged in your own body with every thought from the audience jabbing your heart as you move. Yet unlike dancing, writers can’t avoid the audience. They are haunted by them in every word they write. The audience will weasel the heart out of you, whether you like it or

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The Modern Voice: Keeping Literature Alive

The written word is changing. As technology improves and computers shrink ever smaller each year, people will continue to find quicker and easier ways to access various types of reading materials. Some have predicted that this threatens future literature, as readers may demand stories with lighter themes so they can feel enlightened on the bus ride home—but not too enlightened. This has become a popular concern for literature enthusiasts, but

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Joel Salatin (America’s Libertarian Agrarian Intellectual) Reveals His Writing Secrets

As is true for most readers of garden lit, Joel Salatin entered my awareness in 2006 via Michael Pollan’s The Omnivore’s Dilemma. While I had always been interested in farming and food production, I equated Salatin, a self-described “Christian libertarian environmentalist capitalist lunatic Farmer” with ranching, and so wasn’t compelled, right off, to read his books. After all, I was only an urban gardener who dabbled in growing a few

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I bet I’m not the only one having these feelings

I sat in English class trying to write a paragraph, drawing a blank. I started writing on a topic. Then I realized that what I had written didn’t make any sense. My sentences weren’t clear. I didn’t have the vocabulary I wanted to use right away, and I couldn’t use the translator because I was running out of time. I erased what I had written. I thought if I could

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The Devil Wears Converse

A few summers ago, just as I was beginning to publish Greenwoman, my first magazine venture, I watched the documentary The September Issue with my teenage daughter Lily. The film is a behind-the-scenes look at Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour and her staff during the creation of their fall fashion issue, the most important issue of the year. While I’m not a huge fan of haute couture (Lily is), I appreciate the

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Mary Shelley: “my dreams were all my own”

It is not singular that, as the daughter of two persons of distinguished literary celebrity, I should very early in life have thought of writing. As a child I scribbled; and my favourite pastime, during the hours given me for recreation, was to “write stories.” Still I had a dearer pleasure than this, which was the formation of castles in the air — the indulging in waking dreams — the

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