Tag Winfield Scott Stratton

Stratton, the $10 Million Man (Part 3)

A Testament to a Legacy Continued from: Part 1: “A Test of Faith” Part 2: “Independence and Influence” Winfield Scott Stratton’s life had been directed by prophetic dreams: when he was a kid, he dreamed that he would leave his hometown of Jeffersonville, Indiana to seek his fortune in Colorado. As a middle-aged man, he dreamed that he would find gold on Battle Mountain near the town of Victor, Colorado.

Continue reading…

Stratton, the $10 Million Man (Part 2)

Independence and Influence Continued from: Part 1: “A Test of Faith” As dawn broke on July 4, 1891, Winfield Scott Stratton stood upon his two claims near Victor, Colorado: the Washington and the Independence, named to commemorate the date on which they were claimed. Leslie Popejoy, Stratton’s former co-worker, had grubstaked Stratton the $275 it cost for the claims. Stratton sold a piece of property he owned in Denver for $250

Continue reading…

Stratton, the $10 Million Man (Part 1)

Part 1: A Test of Faith Winfield Scott Stratton, Colorado Springs’ first and biggest nineteenth-century multi-millionaire, was the single largest contributor to Colorado Springs. He left a legacy that still thrives today, although most people don’t know it. This four-part series explores his life and its lasting impact on the Pikes Peak region. Born in Jeffersonville, Illinois in 1848 as one of eight children, by the time he was ten, he

Continue reading…

Winfield Scott Stratton: The $10 Million Man, Part 2

Independence and Influence Continued from: Part 1: “A Test of Faith” As dawn broke on July 4, 1891, Winfield Scott Stratton stood upon his two claims near Victor, Colorado: the Washington and the Independence, named to commemorate the date on which they were claimed. Leslie Popejoy, who had grubstaked Stratton the $275 it cost for the claims, had taken off for Denver after Stratton bought out his share. How did

Continue reading…

Winfield Scott Stratton: The $10 Million Man, Part 1

A Test of Faith Winfield Scott Stratton, perhaps the least known but single largest contributor to Colorado Springs, was an enigma. Known as much for his benevolence as for his eccentricities, Stratton was Colorado Springs’ first and biggest nineteenth-century multi-millionaire. Born in Jeffersonville, Illinois in 1848, he was one of eight children, six of whom were girls. Most of his siblings died in infancy, so by the time he was

Continue reading…